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Dr. William (Bill) Telford

Affiliation : Head, ETIB Flow Cytometry Facility, Center for Cancer Research National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD, USA

Title of the Talk/Lab :Make Your Cytometer (MYO) and Analysis of Cell Apoptosis using Flow Cytometry

William (Bill) Telford received his Ph.D. in microbiology from Michigan State University in 1994, where his laboratory developed some of the earliest techniques for flow cytometric detection of apoptosis.  He received his postdoctoral training in immunology at The University of Michigan Medical School, was appointed assistant scientist at the Hospital for Special Surgery in New York City from 1997 to 1999.  Dr. Telford became a Staff Scientist at the National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health in 1999, and is currently a Senior Associate Scientist and director of the flow cytometry core laboratory in the NCI Experimental Transplantation and Immunology Branch.

Dr. Telford’s main research interests include: instrument development, particularly in the area of novel solid-state laser integration into flow cytometers, and functional characterization of early apoptosis by flow and image cytometry.

Lecture/Lab Module:  Make Your Own Flow Cytometer.  The best way to learn how flow cytometers work is to build one!  The Flow Cytometer Maker Lab is a working cytometer that can be constructed by students from individual components.  Lasers, optics, optomechanics, fluidic and electronic components will be provided that can be assembled into a fully functional instrument.  Both basic and advanced principles of flow cytometry technology will be explored in a hands-on experience.

Relevant Literature:

Shapiro HM, Telford WG (2018) Lasers for flow cytometry:  Current and future trends.  In Current Protocols in Cytometry, Robinson JP, Darzynkiewicz Z, Dobrucki J, Hoffman RA, Nolan JP, Orfao A, Rabinovitch PS, Telford WG, eds., John Wiley and Sons, New York, NY, pp.  1.9.1–1.9.21.

Telford WG (2018) Overview of lasers for flow cytometry.  In Methods in Molecular Biology Volume 1678, Flow Cytometry Protocols, 5th Edition, Hawley TS, Hawley RG, eds., Humana Press, London, UK, pp. 447-478.

Telford WG, Tamul K, Bradford J (2016) Measurement and characterization of apoptosis by flow cytometry.  In Current Protocols in Cytometry, Robinson JP, Darzynkiewicz Z, Dobrucki J, Hoffman RA, Nolan JP, Orfao A, Rabinovitch PS, Telford WG, eds., John Wiley and Sons, New York, NY, Unit 9.49, pp.  9.49.1 – 9.49.28.

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